Bar Closures In Riverside County

Bar Closure June 30

Bar Closures In Riverside County

ORDER OF THE HEALTH OFFICER OF THE COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE
CLOSING ALL BREWPUBS, BREWERIES, BARS, AND PUBS UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

EFFECTIVE DATE OF ORDER: JUNE 30, 2020@ 2:01 AM

AS DIRECTED BY THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND UNDER THE
AUTHORITY OF CALIFORNIA HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE SECTIONS 101030, 101040, 101085,
AND 120175, TITLE 17 CALIFORNIA CODE OF REGULATIONS SECTION 2501, ARTICLE XI OF
THE CALIFORNIA CONSTITUTION; CALIFORNIA GOVERNMENT CODE SECTIONS 8610, 8630,
8634, AND 8665; AND RIVERSIDE COUNTY CODE SECTIONS 442 AND 533.6, THE HEALTH
OFFICER OF THE COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE (“HEALTH OFFICER”) ORDERS:

1. Brewpubs, breweries, bars, and pubs, shall close until those establishments are allowed to resume
operation per state guidance and local permission, unless they are offering sit-down, dine-in meals.
Alcohol can only be sold in the same transaction as a meal. The CDPH Guidance on Bar Closures
can be found at: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/COVID-19/Bar-Closure-
Guidance.aspx

2. Dine-in restaurants, brewpubs, breweries, bars, and pubs that provide sit-down meals shall follow
the dine-in restaurant guidance and should continue to encourage takeout and delivery service
whenever possible. Alcohol can only be sold in the same transaction as a meal. Bar areas within
a dine-in restaurant that cannot follow the dine-in restaurant guidance shall close.

3. Brewpubs, breweries, bars, and pubs that do not provide sit-down meals themselves, but can
contract with another vendor to do so, can serve dine-in meals provided both businesses follow the
dine-in restaurant guidance and alcohol is only sold in the same transaction as a meal.

4. Venues that are currently authorized to provide off sale beer, wine, and spirits to be consumed off
premises and do not offer sit-down, dine-in meals shall follow the guidance for retail operations
and offer curbside sales only, until local and/or statewide rules allow additional retail activity.

5. Producers of beer, wine, and spirits shall follow the guidance for manufacturing operations.

6. This Order does not apply to wineries and wine tasting rooms provided that the winery complies
with the required Guidance for tasting rooms at: https://files.covid19.ca.gov/pdf/guidancerestaurants-
bars.pdf

7. This guidance is not intended for concert, performance, or entertainment venues. Those types of
establishments shall remain closed until they are allowed to resume modified or full operation
through a specific reopening order or guidance. Establishments that serve full meals must
discontinue this type of entertainment until these types of activities are allowed to resume modified
or full operation. All Guidance referenced in this Order can be found at:
https://covid19.ca.gov/industry-guidance/

8. As stated by the California Department of Public Health, community spread of infection is of
increasing concern across the state, and in particular for those counties on the County Monitoring
List. Beyond the impact on the general population, community spread increases the likelihood of
expanded transmission of COVID-19 in congregate settings such as nursing homes, homeless
shelters, jails and prisons. Infection of vulnerable populations in these settings can be catastrophic,
both in terms of high rates of morbidity and mortality of individual residents, as well as through
the high demand such infections would place on the hospital delivery system. Higher levels of
community spread also increase the likelihood of infection among individuals at high risk of serious
outcomes from COVID-19, including the elderly and those with underlying health conditions who
might live or otherwise interact with an infected individual.

9. Community spread of infection is of increasing concern across the state, and in particular for those
counties on the County Monitoring List. Beyond the impact on the general population, community
spread increases the likelihood of expanded transmission of COVID-19 in congregate settings such
as nursing homes, homeless shelters, jails and prisons. Infection of vulnerable populations in these
settings can be catastrophic, both in terms of high rates of morbidity and mortality of individual
residents, as well as through the high demand such infections would place on the hospital delivery
system. Higher levels of community spread also increase the likelihood of infection among
individuals at high risk of serious outcomes from COVID-19, including the elderly and those with
underlying health conditions who might live or otherwise interact with an infected individual.

10. California’s Pandemic Resiliency Roadmap for reopening is a risk-based framework that guides
state and local governments on a path to re-opening industries under strict workplace modifications.
Whereas other industries and establishments were permitted to open with modifications in Stage 2,
bars are in Stage 3 because they pose the highest risk of all sectors allowed to open so far. They
create an environment anchored in significantly high levels of community mixing of individuals
outside of one’s own household, increasing the risk escalating the R-effective, or effective
transmission rate, of COVID-19.

11. A bar, foundationally, is a social setting where typically not only small groups convene, but also
where groups mix with other groups. Physical movement within the establishment, duration of
time spent in the establishment, and the degree of social mixing within individuals and groups are
all greater in bars than in other hospitality sectors. Further, alcohol consumption slows brain
activity, reduces inhibition, and impairs judgment, factors which contribute to reduced
compliance with recommended core personal protective measures, such as the mandatory use of
face coverings and maintaining six feet of distance from people outside of one’s own household.
Louder environments and the cacophony of conversation that are typical in bar settings, also
require raised voices and greater projection of oral emitted viral droplets. The sector’s workforce
faces higher exposure to diseases transmission because of the environment in which they work,
compounded by the necessity for patrons to remove face coverings to consume drinks, especially
while seated at a bar or moving around and mixing. In their totality, these factors present a higher
likelihood of transmission of the coronavirus within groups, between groups, and among the
workforce. These factors have led to an increasing concern by public health professionals within
California and throughout the nation identifying bars as the highest risk sector of non-essential
business currently open. There is a growing body of evidence tracing large COVID-19 outbreaks
in both urban and rural states, to bars.

12. Beyond higher risk of transmission in bar settings, contract tracing, a key measure needed to control
spread, is also more challenging in bars. Undertaking contact tracing of a droplet-spread
communicable disease based on exposure at a bar is extremely difficult because of the constant
mixing among persons, including unknowing prolonged and close contact, and lack of recordkeeping
of patron attendance. Unlike other sectors where tracking who comes in and out of a setting
and where duration of visits are shorter, bars are particularly challenged to do these tasks as well
as necessary, even under the best of modifications.

13. Bars generally attract a younger adult population. While younger adults without co-morbidities
tend to have less severe symptoms and overall disease outcomes, increased cases, even in this
cohort, will lead to increased hospitalizations and deaths. As the virus spreads more broadly in this
population, younger individuals become a source of spread to more vulnerable adults and the
broader community, a factor that is complicated by the fact that younger individuals have a higher
likelihood of asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic infection.

14. This Order is issued as a result of the worldwide pandemic of COVID-19 disease, also known as
“novel coronavirus,” which has infected over 10,000,000 individuals worldwide in 188 countries
and is implicated in over 500,000 worldwide deaths, including over 15,000 cases and over 400
deaths of Riverside County residents.

15. This Order is issued based on evidence of increasing transmission of COVID-19 both within the
County of Riverside and worldwide, scientific evidence regarding the most effective approach to
slow transmission of communicable diseases generally and COVID-19 specifically, as well as
best practices as currently known and available to protect the public from the risk of spread of or
exposure to COVID-19.

16. This Order is intended to address the strain upon the health care system from the effects of the
COVID-19 virus. Similarly, this Order is intended to reduce the likelihood of exposure to
COVID-19, thereby slowing the spread of COVID-19 in communities worldwide.

17. This Order is issued in accordance with, and incorporates by reference, the: March 4, 2020
Proclamation of a State Emergency issued by Governor Gavin Newsom; the March 8, 2020
Declaration of Local Health Emergency based on an imminent and proximate threat to public
health from the introduction of novel COVID-19 in Riverside County; the March 10, 2020
Resolution of the Board of Supervisors of the County of Riverside proclaiming the existence of a
Local Emergency in the County of Riverside regarding COVID-19; the March 10, 2020
Resolution of the Board of Supervisors of the County of Riverside ratifying and extending the
Declaration of Local Health Emergency due to COVID-19; Governor Newsom’s Executive Order
N-33-20 of March 19, 2020 ordering all persons to stay at home to protect the health and wellbeing
of all Californians and to establish consistency across the state in order to slow the spread
of COVID-19; Governor Newsom’s Executive Order N-60-20 of May 4, 2020 and the State
Public Health Officer’s Order of May 7, 2020 and all subsequent orders.

18. This Order is made in accordance with all applicable State and Federal laws, including but not
limited to: Health and Safety Code sections 101030, et seq.; Health and Safety Code sections
120100, et seq.; and Title 17 of the California Code of Regulations section 2501. More
specifically, Health and Safety Code section 120175.5(b) which provides that all governmental
entities in the county shall take necessary measures within the governmental entity’s control to
ensure compliance with this Order and to disseminate this Order to venues or locations within the
entity’s jurisdiction where gatherings may occur.

19. Violation of this Order is subject to fine, imprisonment, or both. (Penal Code section 19;
Government Code sections 8665 and 25132; Health and Safety Code section 120295; County
Ordinances 533 and 556).

Bar Closure



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